Retirement  Plan Limits Announced - 2023

Retirement Plan Limits Announced - 2023

| October 27, 2022
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IRS Limits on Retirement Benefits and Compensation

As published in IRS News Release IR-2022-188, Oct. 21, 2022:

 

2023

2022

2021

401(k), 403(b), 457 Elective Deferral Limit

$22,500

$20,500

$19,500

Catch-Up Contribution Limit (age 50 and older)

$7,500

$6,500

$6,500

Annual Compensation Limit

$330,000

$305,000

$290,000

Defined Contribution Limit

$66,000

$61,000

$58,000

Defined Benefit Limit

$265,000

$245,000

$230,000

Definition of Highly Compensated Employee

$150,000

$135,000

$130,000

Key Employee

$215,000

$200,000

$185,000

IRA Contribution Limit

$6,500

$6,000

$6,000

IRA Catch-Up Contributions (age 50 and older)

$1,000

$1,000

$1,000

Highlights of Changes for 2023

The contribution limit for employees who participate in 401(k), 403(b), most 457 plans, and the federal government’s Thrift Savings Plan has increased to $22,500.

The catch-up contribution limit for employees aged 50 and over who participate in these plans increased to $7,500.

The limitation regarding SIMPLE retirement accounts for 2023 has increased to $15,500.

The income ranges for determining eligibility to make deductible contributions to traditional Individual Retirement Arrangements (IRAs), to contribute to Roth IRAs and to claim the Saver’s Credit all increased for 2023.

Taxpayers can deduct contributions to a traditional IRA if they meet certain conditions. If during the year either the taxpayer or his or her spouse was covered by a retirement plan at work, the deduction may be reduced, or phased out, until it is eliminated, depending on filing status and income (if neither the taxpayer nor his or her spouse is covered by a retirement plan at work, the phase-outs of the deduction do not apply).

Here are the phase-out ranges for 2023:

  • For single taxpayers covered by a workplace retirement plan, the phase-out range is $73,000 to $83,000, up from $68,000 to $78,000.
  • For married couples filing jointly, where the spouse making the IRA contribution is covered by a workplace retirement plan, the phase-out range is $116,000 to $136,000, up from $109,000 to $129,000.
  • For an IRA contributor who is not covered by a workplace retirement plan and is married to someone who is covered, the deduction is phased out if the couple’s income is between $218,000 and $228,000, up from $204,000 and $214,000.
    For a married individual filing a separate return who is covered by a workplace retirement plan, the phase-out range is not subject to an annual cost-of-living adjustment and remains $0 to $10,000.
  • The income phase-out range for taxpayers making contributions to a Roth IRA is increased to between $138,000 and $153,000 for singles and heads of household, up from between $129,000 and $144,000. For married couples filing jointly, the income phase-out range is increased to between $218,000 and $228,000, up from between $204,000 and $214,000. The phase-out range for a married individual filing a separate return who makes contributions to a Roth IRA is not subject to an annual cost-of-living adjustment and remains between $0 and $10,000.

The income limit for the Saver’s Credit (also known as the Retirement Savings Contributions Credit) for low- and moderate-income workers is $73,000 or married couples filing jointly, up from $68,000; $54,750 for heads of household, up from $51,000; and $36,500 for singles and married individuals filing separately, up from $34,000. 

Key limit increased

The limit on annual contributions to an IRA increased to $6,500. The additional catch-up contribution limit for individuals aged 50 and over is not subject to an annual cost-of-living adjustment and remains unchanged at $1,000.

How Stonebridge Can Help

It can be a bit overwhelming to administer a company retirement plan, given all the documentation nuances let alone the deadlines! At Stonebridge Financial Group, we work exclusively with retirement plans and can help you with everything from designing to running your plan. Delegating fiduciary responsibilities can be a great solution for plan sponsors who lack time and the knowledge of ever-changing requirements to manage a retirement plan -- it's is all we've done since our inception back in 2004! Our robust service offering starts with ERISA 3(21) and 3(38) services and is the tip of the iceberg. We are consultants that help you with every aspect of your plan:

  • Investment menu analysis
  • Annual 100+ point ERISA assessment
  • Implementation of comprehensive fiduciary quality management system
  • Deployment of complete plan governance system including fiduciary indemnification
  • Committee fiduciary training
  • Implementing cybersecurity best practices 
  • Plan design including student debt benefits
  • Complete IRS and CPA audit support - we have ex-auditors on staff!
  • Participant 1:1 and group education
  • Fee benchmarking
  • Ensuring participant retirement readiness
  • Consulting on financial wellness
  • Process creation and documentation
  • Plan design
  • Contribution match modeling
  • Annual plan compliance review

We become your outsourced retirement plan officer who dives into the morass of retirement plan details and resolves issues so you don't have to!

Please click here to schedule a short call, give us a call at (855) 530-0500 x601 or email info@stonebridgefinancialgroup.com. We look forward to helping your committee successfully fulfill their fiduciary duties with ease and excellence!

Details on these and other retirement-related cost-of-living adjustments for 2023 are in Notice 2022-55 (PDF)1, available on IRS.gov
1https://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-drop/n-22-55.pdf
Stonebridge is not in the business of providing legal advice with respect to ERISA or any other applicable law. The materials and information do not constitute, and should not be relied upon as, legal advice. The materials are general in nature and intended for informational purposes only.

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